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Depression on the rise for millennials

Depression on the rise for millennials

According to one national report, major depression is rising at a faster rate for millennials and teens compared with any other age group. In fact, over the past decade millennials have seen a 47% increase in major-depression diagnoses.

Many people thrive following mental health interventions

Many people thrive following mental health interventions

New research reports that many people who have suffered from mental illness are able to thrive and lead a high-functioning life. This new study compared the mental health conditions tracked in the survey and other data associated with each participant’s quality of life, including their social relationships, positive emotions, perceived quality of life, and functioning (ability to fulfill life roles).

Taking Steps to Manage Work Stress – Getting Help When You Need It

Taking Steps to Manage Work Stress – Getting Help When You Need It

Work Stress and Burnout can happen to anyone, but CEOs, attorneys, doctors, nurses, clergy advisors, etc., are particularly vulnerable because of the weightiness and responsibility of their roles. Working with someone who understands the particular stresses that working professionals face can help keep you effective, motivated and boost your energy to do the job you want to do.

Caregiver study focuses on the challenges of caring for a partner

Caregiver study focuses on the challenges of caring for a partner

“This study is a reminder to step back and look at what your partner is coping with, to learn about their health conditions, to be conscious of it on a daily basis, and for grown children and clinicians to do the same,” she says. “Having that awareness, and helping one another manage health problems while watching for signs of depression, may help both members of a couple over time.”

Stress accelerates aging, emotional regulation improves well-being

Stress accelerates aging, emotional regulation improves well-being

Scientists in recent years have developed ways to measure biological age by tracking chemical changes in DNA that occur naturally as people age but occur at different times in different people. These so-called “epigenetic clocks” have proved to be better predictors of lifespan and health than chronological age.In a new study, Yale researchers used one such clock, appropriately named “GrimAge,” to ask two questions: How much does chronic stress accelerate that biological clock? And are there ways to slow it down and extend a healthy lifespan? Subjects in this study who scored high on two psychological resilience measures — emotion regulation and self-control — were more resilient to the effects of stress on aging and insulin resistance, respectively.