research news

Overworked doctors at higher risk of depression

Overworked doctors at higher risk of depression

The more hours someone works each week in a stressful job, the more their risk of depression rises, a study in new doctors finds. Working 90 or more hours a week was associated with changes in depression symptom scores three times larger than the change in depression symptoms among those working 40 to 45 hours a week. A higher percentage of those who worked a large number of hours had scores high enough to qualify for a diagnosis of moderate to severe depression.

Sharing meals with others reduces stress, boosts self-esteem

Sharing meals with others reduces stress, boosts self-esteem

Connecting with friends, family, coworkers and neighbors benefits people beyond stress relief. In fact, the survey found 67% of people say sharing a meal remind them of the importance of connecting with other people, and 54% say it reminds them to slow down and take a break. Survey respondents who are employed full or part-time said they would feel less stressed at work if they had more time to take a break and share a meal with a co-worker.

New study focuses on avoiding the pitfalls of social media with emotional awareness

New study focuses on avoiding the pitfalls of social media with emotional awareness

The authors suggest that problematic social comparison can enhance negative feelings of oneself and others, which could explain how risk of depression increases with increased social media use. Engaging primarily in negative content can also enhance these feelings. And lastly, engaging in more social media reduces opportunities for in-person interactions and activities outside of the home.

Treating anxiety during pregnancy may provide beneficial outcomes

Treating anxiety during pregnancy may provide beneficial outcomes

Women who experience anxiety about their pregnancies give birth earlier on average than those who don’t, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

The health risks associated with isolation and loneliness

The health risks associated with isolation and loneliness

Risk of social isolation increases with age due to life factors, such as widowhood and retirement. Nearly 1/4 of U.S. adults ages 65 and older are socially isolated, and prevalence of loneliness is even higher, with estimates of 22% to 47%. A survey from the project describes “Gen Z” (adults currently ages 18-22) as the loneliest generation. Increased isolation and loneliness among younger adults may be attributed to higher social media use and less engagement in meaningful in-person activities.

New study asks: Does watching the news make us sick?

New study asks: Does watching the news make us sick?

High risk individuals frequently became so immersed and personally invested in news stories that the stories dominated the individual’s waking thoughts, disrupted time with family and friends, made it difficult to focus on school or work, and contributed to restlessness and an inability to sleep. Perhaps not surprisingly, people with higher levels of problematic news consumption were significantly more likely to experience mental and physical ill-being than those with lower levels, even when controlling for demographics, personality traits, and overall news use.