Dr. Holland

How to Empower Yourself to Make Positive Change

How to Empower Yourself to Make Positive Change

When we are stressed, when we are tired and overwhelmed, it’s easy to hold our breath without even knowing it. And when we do that, we deprive ourselves of oxygen, which, in turn, limits our ability to think clearly in the moment and do things like problem-solving and affect-regulation.

Caregivers focus on positive emotions to reduce anxiety and depression

Caregivers focus on positive emotions to reduce anxiety and depression

Caring for family members with dementia — which is on the rise in the U.S. — causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers’ risk of depression, anxiety and death. A method presented in one study for coping with that stress by teaching people how to focus on positive emotions reduced their anxiety and depression after six weeks. It also resulted in better self-reported physical health and positive attitudes toward caregiving.

Taking Steps to Manage Work Stress – Getting Help When You Need It

Taking Steps to Manage Work Stress – Getting Help When You Need It

Work Stress and Burnout can happen to anyone, but CEOs, attorneys, doctors, nurses, clergy advisors, etc., are particularly vulnerable because of the weightiness and responsibility of their roles. Working with someone who understands the particular stresses that working professionals face can help keep you effective, motivated and boost your energy to do the job you want to do.

Poor sleep and job stress even more toxic than predicted

Poor sleep and job stress even more toxic than predicted

Every job situation will come with varying degrees of stress and frustration that ebb and flow. Burnout, however, is more than that. It is an all-encompassing feeling that you are being pulled in every direction at once and that no matter what you do, you are unable to make progress or move forward. If chronic burnout is left untreated, it can lead to issues with physical and mental health.

Report finds burnout prevalent in health care community

Addressing clinician burnout will require a deliberate and substantive health care system redesign

Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of U.S. nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) report.
Vanderbilt University Medical Center is among 32 institutions and foundations that sponsored the 296-page report, "Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being," which investigates the causes of widespread clinician burnout and offers solutions to address the problem at its source.

"There's an all too direct connection between clinician burnout and health care safety and quality. While clinician burnout isn't a new problem, its worsening prevalence and impact are due to system factors inherent in the modern health care system," said Matthew Weinger, MD, professor of Anesthesiology and Norman Ty Smith Chair in Patient Safety and Medical Simulation at VUMC, and a member of the NAM authoring committee for the new report.

"The Committee came to realize that addressing clinician burnout will require a deliberate and substantive health care system redesign with a focus on those activities that deliver the most value to patients while enabling and empowering clinicians to deliver high-quality care," he said.

The report discusses key issues that need to be addressed:

  • Clinician burnout needs to be tackled early in professional development and special stressors in the learning environment need to be recognized. Leaders in health care and health professions education have a responsibility to foster, monitor and continuously improve work and learning environments.
  • While some health care technologies appear to contribute to clinician burnout (poorly designed electronic health record systems, for example), there is real potential for well-designed and implemented technologies to help reduce burnout.
  • Federal and state governments, other payors and regulators and the health care industry itself have important roles to play in preventing clinician burnout. Increasing administrative burdens and distracting clinicians from the care of their patients can directly affect burnout.
  • Medical societies, state licensing boards, specialty certification boards, medical education and health care organizations all need to take concrete steps to reduce the stigma for clinicians seeking help for psychological distress and make assistance more easily available.

The report concludes with goals and recommendations centered on creating more positive work and learning environments, reducing administrative burden, enabling technology solutions, providing more support to clinicians and learners, and investing in research to address clinician burnout.


Story Source: Materials provided by Science Daily ---> Note: Content may be edited for style and length. Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2019. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191023172121.htm.


Dr. Jenny Holland"On the job burnout reduces productivity and saps energy, causing feelings of being helpless, hopeless, cynical and resentful. The negative effects of burnout will eventually spill over into every area of life—including home, work and social life. Burnout can also cause long-term physical changes and increased vulnerability to illnesses like colds and flu. Because of its many consequences, it’s important to work through feelings of burnout with a counselor."

Dr. Holland works with professionals suffering from burnout by connecting the dots between symptoms and the root of the problem. She will help you to creatively work with your situation to help you discover new meaning in your work and offer ways you can stay healthy. Dr. Holland will help you learn how to help yourself so you can continue to do the work you love of helping others.

Contact Dr. Holland to get help with these problems today.

Grief Support Group Available

Support group meeting

After the loss of a loved one, a wide variety of feelings and emotions naturally emerge. While family and friends are important during the grieving process, unless they have experienced a close personal loss, they most likely don’t fully “get it.” This is where a support group can become a valuable resource. Grief support groups offer companionship and understanding from others who have experienced a similar loss and are experiencing similar challenges that living with grief brings.

Dr. Jenny Holland, PsyD announces a new weekly support group for those who are grieving the death of a loved one. This group is open to anyone who has lost someone they love. Together we will explore, validate and support feelings and experiences that often accompany loss. Dr. Holland will guide the group through techniques that help to ease emotional pain.

Each group member will have time to share memories while discovering new ways to honor their loved one and themselves through the process. This group is limited to a small number of participants, to facilitate intimate conversation and safe sharing.

The Grief Support Group starts November 8, 2019 and will be held every other Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Dr. Holland’s office located at 621 Cherry St., Santa Rosa, California. To reserve your seat call Dr Holland at 707-479-2946. Participants will be pre-screened to qualify, and a sliding scale fee is offered.