Dr. Holland

Poor sleep and job stress even more toxic than predicted

Poor sleep and job stress even more toxic than predicted

Every job situation will come with varying degrees of stress and frustration that ebb and flow. Burnout, however, is more than that. It is an all-encompassing feeling that you are being pulled in every direction at once and that no matter what you do, you are unable to make progress or move forward. If chronic burnout is left untreated, it can lead to issues with physical and mental health.

Report finds burnout prevalent in health care community

Addressing clinician burnout will require a deliberate and substantive health care system redesign

Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of U.S. nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) report.
Vanderbilt University Medical Center is among 32 institutions and foundations that sponsored the 296-page report, "Taking Action Against Clinician Burnout: A Systems Approach to Professional Well-Being," which investigates the causes of widespread clinician burnout and offers solutions to address the problem at its source.

"There's an all too direct connection between clinician burnout and health care safety and quality. While clinician burnout isn't a new problem, its worsening prevalence and impact are due to system factors inherent in the modern health care system," said Matthew Weinger, MD, professor of Anesthesiology and Norman Ty Smith Chair in Patient Safety and Medical Simulation at VUMC, and a member of the NAM authoring committee for the new report.

"The Committee came to realize that addressing clinician burnout will require a deliberate and substantive health care system redesign with a focus on those activities that deliver the most value to patients while enabling and empowering clinicians to deliver high-quality care," he said.

The report discusses key issues that need to be addressed:

  • Clinician burnout needs to be tackled early in professional development and special stressors in the learning environment need to be recognized. Leaders in health care and health professions education have a responsibility to foster, monitor and continuously improve work and learning environments.
  • While some health care technologies appear to contribute to clinician burnout (poorly designed electronic health record systems, for example), there is real potential for well-designed and implemented technologies to help reduce burnout.
  • Federal and state governments, other payors and regulators and the health care industry itself have important roles to play in preventing clinician burnout. Increasing administrative burdens and distracting clinicians from the care of their patients can directly affect burnout.
  • Medical societies, state licensing boards, specialty certification boards, medical education and health care organizations all need to take concrete steps to reduce the stigma for clinicians seeking help for psychological distress and make assistance more easily available.

The report concludes with goals and recommendations centered on creating more positive work and learning environments, reducing administrative burden, enabling technology solutions, providing more support to clinicians and learners, and investing in research to address clinician burnout.


Story Source: Materials provided by Science Daily ---> Note: Content may be edited for style and length. Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2019. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191023172121.htm.


Dr. Jenny Holland"On the job burnout reduces productivity and saps energy, causing feelings of being helpless, hopeless, cynical and resentful. The negative effects of burnout will eventually spill over into every area of life—including home, work and social life. Burnout can also cause long-term physical changes and increased vulnerability to illnesses like colds and flu. Because of its many consequences, it’s important to work through feelings of burnout with a counselor."

Dr. Holland works with professionals suffering from burnout by connecting the dots between symptoms and the root of the problem. She will help you to creatively work with your situation to help you discover new meaning in your work and offer ways you can stay healthy. Dr. Holland will help you learn how to help yourself so you can continue to do the work you love of helping others.

Contact Dr. Holland to get help with these problems today.

Grief Support Group Available

Support group meeting

After the loss of a loved one, a wide variety of feelings and emotions naturally emerge. While family and friends are important during the grieving process, unless they have experienced a close personal loss, they most likely don’t fully “get it.” This is where a support group can become a valuable resource. Grief support groups offer companionship and understanding from others who have experienced a similar loss and are experiencing similar challenges that living with grief brings.

Dr. Jenny Holland, PsyD announces a new weekly support group for those who are grieving the death of a loved one. This group is open to anyone who has lost someone they love. Together we will explore, validate and support feelings and experiences that often accompany loss. Dr. Holland will guide the group through techniques that help to ease emotional pain.

Each group member will have time to share memories while discovering new ways to honor their loved one and themselves through the process. This group is limited to a small number of participants, to facilitate intimate conversation and safe sharing.

The Grief Support Group starts November 8, 2019 and will be held every other Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. at Dr. Holland’s office located at 621 Cherry St., Santa Rosa, California. To reserve your seat call Dr Holland at 707-479-2946. Participants will be pre-screened to qualify, and a sliding scale fee is offered.

Unresolved childhood trauma linked to poorer health for women

Researchers have long known that childhood trauma is linked to poorer health for women at midlife.

Researchers identify one specific way childhood trauma can affect women

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The national study of more than 3,000 women is the first to find that those who experienced childhood trauma were more likely than others to have their first child both earlier in life and outside of marriage -- and that those factors were associated with poorer health later in life. The findings have implications for public programs to prevent teen pregnancy, said Kristi Williams, lead author of the study and professor of sociology at The Ohio State University. These results suggest that early trauma -- such as the death of a parent, physical abuse or emotional neglect -- may affect young people's decision-making in ways that they can't entirely control.

"It's easy to tell teens that they shouldn't have kids before marriage, but the message won't be effective if they haven't developed the capacity to do that because of trauma they experienced in childhood," Williams said. "It may be necessary to do different kinds of interventions and do them when children are younger." Williams conducted the study with Brian Karl Finch of the University of Southern California. Their results were published today (Sept. 17, 2019) in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Early childhood trauma is "shockingly" common in the United States, the researchers said in the study. One national study conducted between 1995 and 1997 found that only 36 percent of respondents reported having no such adverse childhood experiences. Other research has shown that childhood trauma is strongly associated with multiple health risks, including cancer, diabetes, stroke and early death, Williams said. Much of this work has focused on how early adversity may have biological and neurological effects that would lead to worse health throughout life. "But there hasn't been any attention given to how childhood adversity may affect social and developmental processes in adolescence and young adulthood -- factors that we know are also strong predictors of later health," she said. One of those factors in women is the timing and context of first birth.

Data for this new study came from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, which includes a representative sample of people who were aged 14 to 22 in 1979. The NLSY is run by Ohio State's Center for Human Resource Research. Participants were interviewed every year through 1994 and once every two years since. The final sample for this study included 3,278 women. Each participant reported whether she experienced one or more of six adverse childhood experiences before age 18: emotional neglect, physical abuse, alcoholism in the home, mental illness in the home, death of a biological parent and parental absence. The researchers examined data on how old each participant was when she first gave birth and whether she was married, cohabiting or neither at the time. Finally, participants rated their health at or near age 40.

Findings showed that each additional childhood trauma experienced by the participants was associated with earlier age at first birth and a greater probability for a first birth during adolescence or young adulthood compared to later (age 25 to 39). In addition, each additional trauma was associated with a 24 percent increase in the probability of being unmarried and not cohabiting at first birth compared to the likelihood that they were married when their first child was born. The researchers then conducted statistical tests that showed early and non-marital births were a key reason why children who experienced trauma were more likely to report poorer health at midlife.

"It is the idea of 'chains of risk' -- one thing leads to another," Williams said. "Childhood trauma leads to social and biological risks that lead to early and nonmarital birth which can lead to health problems later in life." The findings also cast doubt on the notion that childbearing decisions are the result only of the culture in which children grow up, she said. Some policymakers have claimed that some people don't value marriage enough, and if they were just encouraged not to have kids until after they're married, they would be better off, Williams said. "You can promote this 'success sequence' -- go to college, get a job, get married and have a child -- exactly in that order. But the reason some people don't do that isn't just cultural, it is structural," Williams said. "When people experience traumas early in life, it makes it less likely that they will be able to make those positive choices."


Dr. Holland's Perspective

"If we experience an extremely stressful or disturbing event, it can us feeling helpless and emotionally out of control. Psychological trauma can cause a person to struggle with upsetting emotions, recurring memories and every day anxiety. Unresolved childhood trauma can also cause feelings of being numb, disconnected and unable to trust other people. Whether the trauma happened in your childhood or just yesterday, it is important to understand that you can make healing changes and move on with your life in positive ways."

Experiencing trauma in childhood can result in a severe and long-lasting effect. When childhood trauma is not resolved, a sense of fear and helplessness carries over into adulthood, setting the stage for more trauma. There are steps you can take to overcome the pain, learn to trust and connect to others again, and regain your sense of emotional balance. To learn more or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Holland call 707-479-2946.

Bullying prevention study highlights a healthy need to belong

A sense of belonging among youth prevents bullying

A supportive community environment reduces likelihood of bullying in children

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Research has shown that, despite great efforts, one in three children continue to experience bullying in school. However, research also has indicated that environmental and psychological factors might play an important role in minimizing bullying behaviors.

Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that students who feel a greater sense of belonging with their peers, family and school community are less likely to become bullies. Their findings suggest that parents and teachers should consider ways to create a supportive and accepting environment both at home and at school.

Christopher Slaten and Chad Rose, associate professors in the MU College of Education, along with Jonathan Ferguson, a graduate candidate in the counseling psychology program, analyzed survey responses from more than 900 middle school students from rural schools throughout the U.S. The survey addressed their sense of belonging among peers, family and school community as well as bullying behavior. For example, they were asked if they upset others for the fun of it or if they spread rumors.

The results indicate that the more a student feels like they belong among their peers and family, the more likely they will feel like they belong at school. In addition, the more they feel like they belong within their school community, the less likely they were to report bullying behaviors. This indicates that parents might be able to play a proactive role in increasing their child's sense of belonging at school by focusing on improving family belongingness. Slaten suggests that one of the ways parents can increase a child's sense of family belonging is to organize activities that cater to every child's interests.

"If you have children with varying interests, it might be beneficial to suggest the whole family get together to attend each other's events and activities, even if it doesn't please the whole crowd every time," Slaten said. "By encouraging siblings to support each other, parents can help their children feel like their interests are accepted and that they fit within the family unit."

Rose adds that teachers and school leaders also should consider techniques and programs that create a supportive environment for students. Some examples include starting clubs for students with various interests, offering to lend an ear to students who need someone to talk to and consider community-building events.

"What we have found is that students' perceptions of how supportive and accepting their school environment is has the power to alter bullying behavior," Rose said. "This means that even acts of simple compassion and efforts to create an accepting and supportive space for students can help prevent bullying in schools. This is empowering news for teachers, students and their families."

"Understanding the relationship between youths' belonging and bullying behavior: An SEM Model," was published in Emotional & Child Psychology.

Story Source: Read this article on Science Daily - Materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia. University of Missouri-Columbia. "Students with a greater sense of school-belonging are less likely to become bullies." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 July 2019. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190730125331.htm.


Dr. Holland's Perspective

Bullying is a behavior pattern that expresses as harming and humiliating others. Bullies typically seek out those who appear to be more vulnerable than themselves. In the real world, bullying is not the same thing as aggression; it is a deliberate and repeated attempt to cause harm to others who are more vulnerable. In our digital environment electronic bullying has also become a significant problem, an attractive alternative for bullies as this type of harassment can often be carried out anonymously.

Adults have a very important role to play in making children bully-proof, and that involves empowering children with self-confidence and a sense of belonging, as this article highlights. Parents who model healthy assertiveness to their children at home are taking the correct measures to prevent bullying. It is also important to make sure that children know how to, and feel free to speak up for themselves both at home an when in public.

Therapy for tweens, teens and their parents

Every child responds differently to life changes. Some events that may impact a child or teen’s mental health include:

  • The birth of a sibling
  • The death of a loved one, such as a family member or a pet
  • Physical or sexual abuse
  • Poverty or homelessness
  • Natural disaster
  • Domestic violence
  • Moving to a new place or attending a new school
  • Being bullied
  • Taking on more responsibility than is age-appropriate
  • Parental divorce or separation

Therapy is a place for you to connect and process your thoughts and feelings in a safe place. Dr. Holland can help you develop effective tools to cope with what is going on. However bad you think it is right now, we can face it together.  I believe that forming a strong personal identity is an important aspect of your growth and development, leading to a brighter future.

Contact Dr. Holland to learn more and to schedule an appointment or call 707-479-2946.